Exciting Semester of Events at the Institute For Detroit Studies

detroit-studiesPlease see the following list of events at the Institute for Detroit Studies this semester.  We look forward to seeing you at these opportunities to engage in critical thinking and dialogue in and about Detroit.

Brown Bag Lunch
Bring your lunch to LA 241 from 11:45-1:15 and engage with cutting edge research and practice in Detroit.  Better yet, encourage your students to come!

October 10th, 2013
Michael Sabbagh, MA
Wayne State University and founding editor of Critical Moment

Social Justice Journalism in Detroit

November 18th, 2013
Brandon Ward, Ph.D. Candidate, Purdue University
Roots of Environmental Justice: Race, Labor, and the Landscape of the Urban Crisis in Detroit

Defining Detroit Series, October 10, 2013, 7:30 pm
As part of Marygrove College’s Defining Detroit series.  Prof. Melba Joyce Boyd and Prof. Frank Rashid will present a joint presentation on Robert Hayden and Dudley Randall.  Film clips and bio-critical discussion of the Detroit writers will trace the relationship between their lives and their writings. 7:30 pm, Marygrove College Theatre, 8425 West McNichols, Detroit. Free and open to the public.  Call 313-927-1383 for information.

Teasdale presentation, Sept. 9: French Roots in Great Lakes, 18th century

The first “brown bag lunch” presentation of the academic year (organized by the Institute for Detroit Studies) will take place on Monday, September 9, in LA 241, from 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.  The speaker is Guillaume Teasdale of the University of Windsor.  He will speak about the French colonial presence in the region, focusing on Detroit, during the 18th century.

Mary Byrnes and Tom Klug are also discussing likely presentations in October and November, so stay tuned.

18th Century Detroit

Concluding IDS Brown Bag on April 11th

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPlease join us for the 2012-13 concluding IDS Brown Bag on April 11th from 11:30-1:30 in LA 241. Craig Hennigan (Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Communications, Wayne State University) will discuss Racialized Depictions in Detroit Documentary. 

There is a large effort being undertaken to revitalize postindustrial rust belt cities.  Detroit, Michigan has had an influx of filmmakers documenting that effort to increase business and economic opportunities.  While racial tropes and memes have been studied in many forms of fictional narrative films, there is less work done in the documentary genre.  Finding racial “semes” in the film Detroit Lives, we see that the documentary style can be used to shut the black body out of discourses of urban revitalization.  Because documentary implies truth-telling and recording of history, the style is especially problematic when depicting the black body in ways that omit them from the possession of the city spaces in which they dwell.

Institute for Detroit Studies presents…Underground Detroit: Illegal Europeans, Bootlegged Liquor, and the Politics of Policing America´s Motor City, 1924-1941

Detroit immigrant circa 1920This is part of a continuing multi-disciplinary series of presentations and discussions focusing on recent scholarship about Detroit.

You are invited to attend a presentation by Ashley Johnson, Ph.D. Candidate at Northwestern University, entitled:

 

Underground Detroit: Illegal Europeans, Bootlegged Liquor, and the Politics of Policing America´s Motor City, 1924-1941 Continue reading

Institute of Detroit Studies sponsors new presentation series

Fort Ponchartrain 1701

The Institute for Detroit Studies at Marygrove College is introducing a new multi-disciplinary series of presentations and discussions focusing on recent scholarship about Detroit.

You are invited to attend a presentation entitled “France and the Founding of Detroit, 1701” by Sara Chapman Williams, Associate Professor of History at Oakland University and author of Private Ambition and Political Alliances: The Phélypeaux de Pontchartrain Family and Louis XIV’s Government, 1650-1715. Continue reading

Marygrove’s Institute for Detroit Studies’ next presentation is Nov. 13, 2012

Marygrove’s Institute for Detroit Studies is sponsoring a continuing, multi‐disciplinary series of presentations and discussions focusing on recent scholarship about Detroit.

You are invited to a presentation by Thomas B. Jankowski, Ph.D.
Associate Director of the Institute of Gerontology and Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute, Wayne State University:

Hard Times in the Great City of Plenty: The Detroit Department of Public Welfare and the Eloise Infirmary During the Great Depression Continue reading

Marygrove to host presentation on the Wildcat Strikes of the 1970s

The Institute for Detroit Studies at Marygrove College is sponsoring a new multi-disciplinary series of presentations and discussions focusing on recent scholarship about Detroit.

You are invited to attend a presentation by Michael Stauch, Ph.D. Candidate at Duke University, called:  “Wildcat of the Streets: Working-Class Resistance in Detroit in the 1970s.” Continue reading